Posts from our General news and updates bloggers

The great business thinker Milton Friedman once said “the business of business is business”. Perhaps at the time this was true but I must admit that this idea has never sat comfortably with me. In fact, I positively disagree with it – with a passion. Business, businesspeople and business education have the most phenomenal power to impact positive change in the world. Business school equips students with skills and knowledge to act as global citizens, charged to support those less fortunate. In my opinion, “the business of business is responsibility”. I refer to responsibility in all its facets. Responsibility to drive stakeholder value, to ensure good customer experience, to protect consumer rights and to deal responsibly with both employees and clients. But the responsibility of good business extends further – to use our skills and experience to support those in society that require assistance; whether this be through giving time, financial assistance or guidance. CEO of cloud computing giant SalesForce, Mark Benioff, devised the 1:1:1 model of integrated corporate philanthropy. The model is a commitment to contribute 1% of equity, 1% of employee hours and 1% of product back to the community it serves and has now been adopted by over 700 companies worldwide. During my Silicon Valley GIFT with LBS, I was privileged to see the UCSF Benioff Children’s Hospital in South San Francisco; a world-class medical facility that not only treats thousands of sick children each year but is committed to improving children’s health worldwide. The project is a testament to Benioff’s commitment to philanthropy, CSR and the ‘business of responsibility’.

As a business school student from a non-profit background, creating impact has always been of the utmost importance to me. Following my time with the LBS in California, I took the opportunity to connect with a NY-based child health charitable foundation. Together with a team of counsellors and medical personnel, we brought 50 children suffering from cancer to Orlando for a week of fun and respite. Many of these children have interrupted intense chemotherapy sessions and prolonged hospital stays (think 6months plus), at the approval of their physicians, to spend a few days relaxing on rollercoasters and eating ice-cream in Florida’s winter sun. Most of these children are bald, many are wheelchair-bound and several are constantly wired to medical machinery and monitors. Imagine, therefore, people’s surprise as they watched us scream our way through roller-coaster rides and dance alongside characters at the Disney parades. Days were spent zooming around The Magic Kingdom, SeaWorld and the Universal Studio Parks. Nights were spent sleepless – administering drugs, prepping gastric tubes and dealing with medical complications. Armed with open-access trips to ToysRUs, skip-the-queue passes at all amusement parks and fireworks displays galore, the trip of a lifetime was had by all and unbridled happiness permeated the entire experience. Although fun and laughter hasn’t yet been scientifically-proven to cure cancer, there is no doubt that all the kids returned home with a fresh hope, renewed smiles and greater strength to battle and overcome their challenges. Many of our kids are already back in hospitals across the US undergoing treatment – I wish them all well and a New Year filled with only much happiness and good health!

The London Business School is committed to “changing the way the world does business” and an integral facet of this pledge is to positively impact society. LBS’ trifecta: The Volunteers Club, Net Impact Club and Impact Consulting Club offer some of our best talent to the community; giving guidance, time and resources to support local non-profits and social enterprises. It is something about which our school community is incredibly proud and for many students, involvement in these clubs is the start of a lifelong pursuit in driving impact from operations to the boardroom, and a commitment to solving communal and global challenges. LBS is a school committed to holistic business education – an institution that creates leaders who solve problems using their minds as well as their hearts.

Wishing all our readers – students, potential students, alums and supporters – a very happy and successful 2017!

Read the rest of this entry »

Silicon Valley – the name has engendered legendary status in recent decades as the global hub for innovation and technology. And our week in the Valley certainly didn’t disappoint! I was very fortunate to be selected to attend the Global Immersion Field Trip based out of San Francisco and the stellar line-up of big tech companies, start-ups and venture capital firms, carefully allocated into a jam-packed schedule, kept us busy from dawn until dusk. Highlights of the trip included a presentation at Andreessen Horowitz by partner Todd Ludwack, an ex-exec of eBay. A16Z (as it is known in the industry) is a VC powerhouse based in Menlo Park, with successful exits in household brands such as Skype, Groupon and Instagram to name just a few. Ludwack shared with us frameworks with which to analyse digital platform propositions and investments (the likes of Uber and AirBnB) as well as some lessons-learned from his time at the VC house. In particular, he led an interesting discussion on first and second order effects when it comes to making investments – not only predicting outcomes as the business expands across markets but predicting secondary consequences of these changes that may have knock-on effects in new markets or sectors. Contrastingly, a small-group presentation at SoftTech VC led to fascinating insights into a firm that invests in very early stage ventures – when an entrepreneur may be armed with justa dream and a prototype – and whose expertise has led to some of the greatest edtech, platforms and wearable successes to emerge from the Bay Area (think FitBit, EventBrite and Twitter).

Later in the week, we had the ‘inverse experience’ through visits to several start-ups, a great opportunity to see the entrepreneurial space from a different perspective. We were treated to passionate presentations by entrepreneurs and co-founders from promising ventures such as DoubleDutch (a firm revolutionising live engagement marketing) from people that have grown a vision and personally tackled problems across the whole gamut of organisational functions.

Another fantastic visit included a tour and panel discussion at Pinterest. Everything you hear about working life in the Valley – the funky office space, the sushi chef slicing uramaki in the centre of the workspace, bicycles covered in flowers hanging from the ceiling, an endless mountain of muffins and cakes overflowing in open-plan kitchens filled with employees animatedly schmoozing in shorts, T-shirts and flip-flops. As soon as we walked into the office, our cohort was ‘Pinterested’ – challenging staff to ping-pong and table football games in the lobby. But when we finally got down to business, the managers we met knew their business analytics backwards – from potential opportunities for growth using existing profit drivers right down to what would be trending in the coming season for middle-agedmales in Tokyo.

Singularity University is a bit of a misnomer. It’s not really a university but a
think-tank and it doesn’t really focus on one technology but rather how many different emerging technologies can be leveraged and interfaced in order to drive growth and solve global challenges. A presentation by ardent futurist Darlene Damm opened our minds to new research in areas that will transform the way we live in the coming years – artificial intelligence and machine learning, bioengineering and regenerative medicine, big data and augmented reality were just a few of the topics touched upon during our workshop. The focus at Singularity is on “exponential tech” – technologies whose adoption and development can have skyrocketing impact in all industries across all markets. A hands-on session also gave us the opportunity  to see some of these new technologies in action – from having a chat with a cognitive robot to running around with Virtual Reality goggles, fully immersed in another dimension. One of the great take-homes for me from SU was a new way of thinking about technology application. As a non-gamer I was excited to see that research was underway to use VR headsets in the provision of palliative care and pain management for burns victims and other trauma patients. SU encourages students and professionals to ask the big questions. They don’t claim to have all the answers but they promote great vision, ‘moonshot thinking’ and alternative ways to think about, apply and leverage new technologies to impact meaningful change in the world.

No visit to Silicon Valley would be complete without a visit to Apple HQ or the Googleplex. At Apple we had the opportunity to meet two senior product managers and following several presentations had the opportunity to ask some of life’s most pertinent questions – why did Apple choose to remove the headphone jack from the iPhone 7? What’s the thinking behind the TouchBar on the new Macbook Pro? Why doesn’t Apple expand its portfolio of products? These questions may seem trivial but what lies behind them is masses of market research carefully formulated into intricate strategy applied to product design. The outcome is one of the world’s most beloved brands that plans the user experience right down to the carefully-engineered iPhone box that builds a one-second anticipation when lifting the lid for the first time. As someone with a non-profit background in the health space, I was particularly excited to hear from a lead at Apple’s Accessibility team. Apple  are constantly trying to add new features or extras to their products to ensure that they are functional for all members of society.  This goes far beyond adjusting font size for the visually impaired and ranges from ‘AssistiveTouch’ head-movement-controlled touchpads for people suffering with cerebral palsy to syncing devices with hearing aids to enable better quality conversations for those with partial deafness. Thankfully many never have the need to enter Settings>General>Accessibility on our iPhones but take a look at the impressive plethora of adaptations Apple works on to ensure accessibility and quality user experience for all users regardless of capability.

The Googleplex has a mythical status in the professional world. Ball-ponds at work. Croissant buffets lining the corridors. Self-driving cars whizzing around the parking lot, darting in between parked Google Maps vehicles with their iconic rooftop cameras. All this may be true. But this is not what stood out for me at Google. Several months ago I read Schmidt and Rosenberg’s “How Google Works” – a fantastic read for anyone with a keen interest in organisational behaviour and a passion for understanding how the world’s source of knowledge operates. The take-home message from the book was that Google is all about people and the culture they foster amongst their employees. This could not have been seen more clearly than on our visit to Mountain View at the Google HQ. We had the chance to chat with several LBS alums that are working out there in a range of roles from product management to business strategy. What came across most strongly was their love for Google and the freedom they have to pursue new opportunities and ‘self-actualise’ (in Maslow OB terminology). Googlers, as they are known, strive to maintain an entrepreneurial outlook in the face of global operations; a tremendous feat. They do this by giving their employees autonomy to be creative, to innovate and to follow their passions. The result of such policies (including 20% Time – the commandment for all Googlers to spend a fifth of their time in the pursuit of innovative projects – that according to employees results in working 120% of the time!) are some world-changing products including Gmail. Much food for thought to be gleaned from our time at the Googleplex in hiring talented people and allowing their enthusiasm and self-motivation to shine.

Visits to Electronic Arts (the world renowned EA gaming company), the beautiful Stanford University and their Design School, Autodesk and Shop.co among others topped off an incredible week but it would be remiss not to make special mention of the LBS alum community in the Bay Area. It was fantastic for our cohort to meet the incredible populations of LBSers and our supporters based out in the San Francisco area. One of the major plugs of our school is the global network of contacts as alumni forge their international professional careers. Indebted to the school for the education, life skills and opportunities afforded to us, it is really wonderful to meet LBSers from across the professional spectrum who offer advice, guidance, time, friendship and professional support. The large networking evening was particularly lively and enjoyable and was a great opportunity to link with those in the finance, consulting, technology and start-up spaces – united by our common love and gratitude to the London Business School. A big thank you to the Admin team – in particular Kelly and Fiona – for making such a wonderful, busy and exciting trip possible!

Pinterest

 

 

Read the rest of this entry »

At the end of each term I look at the data we collect through student activities.

Below, I’ve put together five quick summaries of some different ways of looking at club activities in the Autumn term.

Which clubs do you think are the best?

 

Top five clubs, by number of registrations to events:

Club RSVPs
Private Equity & Venture Capital 2001
Finance 1459
Industry 1270
Investment Management 1265
Consulting 1085

 

Top five clubs, with the highest % of alumni and executive students:

Club % of ‘exec’ RSVPs
Volleyball 44%
Sailing 40%
Poker 33%
Entrepreneurship 31%
Real Estate 31%

One of the advantages of LBS is the diversity of programmes. This table shows the % of registrations from alumni and our senior career students that are also often studying part-time: Sloan, EMBAs, MiF PT and Executive Education programmes.

Simply put, if you’re an MBA and want to connect with the members of our community who are most likely to be able to help find you a job, it may be time to start learning volleyball…

 

Top five clubs, with the highest ratings for networking:

Clubs Networking rating
Military in Business 4.8
Women in Business 4.5
Energy 4.4
Healthcare 4.4
Finance 4.3

We asked students to rate whether the Professional Interest Clubs had helped them ‘connect with people and businesses relevant to their future career’.

5 = Strongly agree; 3 = neither agree/disagree; 1 = Strongly disagree

 

Top five clubs, with the highest ratings for learning:

Clubs Rating for learning
Military in Business 4.4
Finance 4.4
Energy 4.3
Industry 4.3
Net Impact 4.3

We asked students to rate whether the Professional Interest Clubs had helped them ‘gain knowledge and/or skills relevant to their future career’.

5 = Strongly agree; 3 = neither agree/disagree; 1 = Strongly disagree

 

Top five clubs, which send emails their members actually read:

Clubs % emails opened
Women’s Touch Rugby 71
Nordic 70
Women’s Football 67
Military in Business 66
Snow 59

 

A big thank you to all our club leaders and officers who make LBS such a vibrant community! If you want to find out more about any of the clubs, have a look at: clubs.london.edu/groups

 

Jon Conradi
Senior Student Activities Manager
Degree Programmes Office

 

Read the rest of this entry »

Being a Student Ambassador, I have been asked about advice regarding preparing for the GMAT a lot lately. I thought that it would be a good idea for me to pen down my thoughts out in the open for everyone’s benefit. Please take my advice with a pinch of salt as it is purely my opinion.

I believe that preparing for the GMAT is a three-part exercise – 1. Assessing your strengths and weaknesses, 2. Maximising your RoI w.r.t your score, and 3. Giving the exam. Let me elaborate on each of them in detail in the text that follows.

Assessing your strengths and weaknesses: This simply comes down to giving a couple of mock tests before you start your preparation. I strongly recommend GMATPrep for this as it is as close to the actual exam in terms of difficulty and format as possible. You could also take other mock tests freely available from sources on the internet which give detailed break up of your weaknesses such as Kaplan’s Free GMAT Test here. Whatever your test might be, that objective must be to figure out areas that need most work.

Maximising your RoI: Now that you have identified areas that require most of your efforts, its time to focus on them and nail them. Not all sources of preparation are good for everything. I felt that while Kaplan was pretty good for the quantitative and AWA sections, it was sorely inadequate for the verbal section (where Manhattan guides were extremely useful). That said, the most important sources for preparation are the Official GMAT guides of course.

Now that you are preparing well, it is always a great practice to see how much you have progressed. I believe that nailing the GMAT is all about adequate practice. Keep giving as many tests as you can. Some of the free resources I felt were incredibly useful were: VeritasPrep and the Economist GMAT Tutor. Take as many full length tests as you can so that you have an intuition about the time and format.

Exam Day: All you have to do is to remember all the work you put in and stay calm. If you are feeling that that exam is getting harder, it only means that you are doing well. Be cognizant of the time left and the questions left to be answered at all times. You will have a greater penalty for not attempting than getting some questions wrong.

Well, that about sums about the generic advice I can give on this topic. However, if you feel that I could help you with something specific, feel free to reach out to me or a leave a comment below.

Read the rest of this entry »

Many university club events are just about having fun. Deciding whether to take part is pretty simple.

Business school clubs provide a breadth and depth of professional activities such as speaker events, competitions, career treks, conferences and leadership positions. This can make it more difficult to decide what to get involved in.

How do I make the most out of these opportunities? What will I learn? What are the networking opportunities? How do I avoid missing out whilst not spreading myself too thin? What should I put on my CV?

 

My advice – as the Senior Student Activities Manager at LBS - would be to treat them as part of your professional development and take a structured approach:

 

Step 1 – Frame

Think about your long-term career aims, what gaps are there between where you are now and where you want to be? How could extra-curricular activity help?

Link this to the advice from Career Services and Organisational Behaviour Courses.

As an example, these slides are from a presentation by Professor Margaret Ormiston on how to use club leadership as a personal development opportunity:

(link: http://www.slideshare.net/londonbusinessschool/incoming-leaders)

 

Step 2 – Explore and develop

There are a huge amount of club events – you will regularly have to choose between different activities.  Actively assess their relevance to you and what you’re trying to achieve, don’t just follow the crowd.

Ask yourself – How will the activity help me develop relevant skills, expertise, networks? How do they help me find out more about areas that interest me?

Establish one or two tangible outcomes that you would aim to get out of each event e.g. a new contact or an alumni’s perspective on a business you’re considering joining.

Student leadership roles can also provide a relatively safe environment to practise particular skills or try out new ways of leading.

 

Step 3 – Demonstrate

Club activity isn’t going to help your CV!

Once you’re in business school, your club involvement is unlikely to make much difference to your CV.

To illustrate this, a few years ago we analysed CV submissions to consultancy firms to see if different content changed the likelihood of being invited to interviews. We found there was no statistically significant benefit to putting student leadership roles on CVs.

Instead, think about how you could talk about your different activities in interviews.

Think about what your club involvement says about your willingness to contribute to the community you’re in, how it shows passion for your area of business, how you have been able to use contacts that will be valuable in your future role.

Specific experiences may also help complement your business experience. For example, club leaders often have plenty of examples of how they’ve been able to motivate others or resolve conflicts. They can also provide ‘safe’ examples of failure and learning.

 

Step 4 – Reflect

Periodically, take time to reflect: What have you learnt? Do you need to reassess your involvement? Are you now able to focus on a narrower range of businesses or opportunities?

Talk to your peers and compare what you’re getting from these activities. Peer-to-peer coaching can also be a valuable tool – now is a great time to practise: https://hbr.org/2010/02/cultivate-your-coaching-networ-2/

Take time every few weeks to reflect on what you’re learning through student activities and go through these steps again.

 

 

To give some examples here are a selection of some of the great learning opportunities through student-led activities at London Business School:

 

-          Practise stock picking (and presenting your picks)

-          Student leadership as a way to practise ‘delivering through others’

-          Get involved in the TELL Series to hear entrepreneurial success stories first-hand and help find and select inspiring founders

-          Take part in the Global Social Venture Competition to test your business idea:

Read the rest of this entry »
avatar

Location Matters

Posted by: Ly Le

If you have come across any of LBS’ myriad of web banners, sponsored links, magazine ads (and I am sure you have, what else could have led you to this post?), you must have realized that we are pretty proud of our prime location in London, and we make rather intensive use of it in our marketing. In fact, the title of this blog post is more or less taken straight from a slide in the presentation deck we used in information sessions for prospective students. Does that make this entire post of mine entirely repetitive, therefore a waste of time? I hope not, because when our Admissions Team mention London, they usually make it synonymous with “job opportunities“, “leading financial institutions“, “world’s biggest companies“, and of course, they are absolutely right, but personally when I think London, I tend to think more of “an awesome place to live“. So, as an amateur photographer who is attracted to all things pretty, and an aspiring living contradiction to the general perception that the LBS Masters in Finance is all about numbers and figures, I’d like to present to you 10 photos from my London collection, in the hope to convince you that it’s worthy to come to LBS, not just for working the job, but also for living the life.

First, as a matter of fact, there is the school itself, which is quite breathtakingly beautiful:

LBS

Here’s my view whilst studying in the Nash garden:

Nash Garden

Then there are the classics, Eye, Bridge, Tower:

London Eye

Tower Bridge

Tower of London

That picture of the Tower of London was color edited,  obviously, but the sweeping mass of poppies are 100% real. Those poppies belong to an ongoing display at the Tower to commemorate the outbreak of the First World War. In London, there are plenty of chances for that, you know, to be impressed and to take a picture and edit it to impress your friends at home. Or you can also easily ask someone to take a picture of you and tweak it a bit to make it look like you are in the middle of a classic movie, because London is just convenient like that. This is me at Piccadilly Circus, for example:

Piccadilly Circus

There are also nice, little known things that just happened to catch your eyes, like this wall of wine-red vines that I came across on my way to Greenwich Park:

Red vines

Talk about Greenwich, if you’re in the area, definitely do NOT miss out on visiting the Old Royal Naval College. I was there last month and was treated to a very interesting (and totally free) performance featuring the renowned diarist Samuel Pepys.

ORNC

Now that we mention diaries and such, you guys should be aware that London is a heaven for book lovers. Fact: Waterstone’s Piccadilly is Europe’s largest bookshop.

Waterstone's 1

I went there last weekend, spent 3 hours and a considerable amount of pound sterling, and I fully plan to go back next week, because, well:

Waterstone's 2

The very same could be said for London, you will never reach the end of this city, so let’s get to exploring as soon and as much as possible, shall we?

I will see you at our starting point, the LBS campus, Regent’s Park, London NW1 4SA.

 

 

P.S. Do contact me at any time if you have burning questions regarding the where to go and what to see around London.

Read the rest of this entry »

So I decided to pursue an MBA degree. It is a thought process that many go through at some point in their careers. I did too. I even blogged about it. I finally decided to apply to the EMBA programme at the London Business School. Why, you ask? There were three very concrete reasons.

First was the structure of the programme. The modular format gave me immense flexibility. I could continue working and earning while I learnt. The format also enabled me to immediately apply what I learnt. Second was the nature of the programme. I am already past the individual contributor stage in my organisation. A General Management focus was just what I needed. Third was the brand name. Responding to the question ‘Where are you doing your MBA from?’ with ‘London Business School’ usually results in raised eyebrows (wonder, not suspicion) and a hint of a sense of awe. In fact, this programme fitted my needs so perfectly that I did not apply to any other MBA programme.

So, I started my application process. I have applied for full time MBA programmes at various top-ranked universities in the past. There is very less interaction with the admissions team until one gets an interview. With the London Business School EMBA, I had someone reach out to me almost instantly. The first thing I noticed was how nice she and everyone else I interacted with was. She was very courteous, knew all the answers to my (often frivolous) questions, and was prompt in her replies. It felt like they really wanted me to have a good application experience.

I went through the cycle of writing essays, re-writing them and then re-writing some more. The single most important piece of advice I can give you here, is that you must write from your heart. You’re combining so many pieces of information in your application that any discrepancies are visible almost immediately. Sure, you want to portray yourself to be the best candidate that you can be. But I think authenticity and honesty are valued immensely at the London Business School. I chose to focus on what I could bring that no one  else could, on my unique story and on how much I would really love to be part of this programme.

Lo and behold, I had an interview call. I visited the Dubai campus on a scorching June morning. The interview started on time and I had senior programme members interview me along with the admissions committee. I liked the fact that selecting candidates was considered a task important enough to have such senior people present. They covered an exhaustive range of topics through their questions, and it felt as though they wanted to understand me from a holistic perspective. Now I recruit for my company, and have interviewed over a thousand candidates during the course of my career. But this was a different experience. I thought I was really good at reading people, but I came out of the interview with absolutely no idea of what they thought of me. I thought to myself, ‘These guys are good. I have never seen such a poker face.’

In the end, I didn’t have to worry too much. I got my offer, and I accepted it without hesitation. The poker faces have been replaced with warm smiles. Now, with two modules completed, I am even more confident that my decision to apply to this programme was correct. But more on that later.

Read the rest of this entry »

Our student-led conferences are back!

This year’s events begin with the China Business Forum on 18 October, so I thought this would be a good opportunity to talk about the award for best student-led event.

I am Jon, the Senior Student Activities Manager at the School, and my team helps support the multitude of professional student-led clubs and events that are such a prominent part of student life here at London Business School. Last year was the second year that I ran club awards for the autumn and spring terms. At the end of each academic year I also look back at the best student-led event of the year.

While there are always incredible cultural trips and a constant stream of high quality career treks, I tend to be most interested in our student-led conferences. These present some of the best student-led activities in terms of enhancing students’ professional development and raising the profile of our brand. They are also a great way for the conference team to practise leadership skills and learn more about their sector.

Last year we had our first ‘perfect’ conference according to feedback from attendees*; we also saw our first examples of our conferences making it into international press (e.g. the Asset Management Conference ). Several other conferences also raised their profile and it was great to see an improvement overall (on an already high standard). The best events tended to be those that concentrated on what an attendee gains from the event rather than making the event ‘bigger’:

Conferences 2013-14 2012-13
Number of conferences surveying their attendees 17 13
Average score 4.4 / 5 4.2 / 5
% positively recommending 93% 86%
 Approximate number of attendees  2000  1800

More details on the conference surveys below*

 

My shortlist of the best conferences of 2013-14

This is from a combination of survey results, feedback from attendees and colleagues and from working with the teams:

 

Africa Business Summit (Summer 2014)
Beyond the hype: The not-for-tourists guide to investing in Africa

This was arguably our most professional event and was on an impressive scale: 45 speakers, sold out with 350 attendees (the majority external guests), over 20 sponsors and partners, moderated by a CNN business correspondent (Zain Asher), the most social media engagement of any of our events and they also launched an entrepreneurship competition.

This conference, more than any other I’ve seen, highlighted the hard-work, determination and ability of its organisers and the club’s presidents – it was a year in the planning and excelled across all areas.

If you aren’t currently thinking about doing business in Africa this conference (and the club itself) will change your mind.

 

eurOUT (Autumn 2013)
the premier conference for LGBT MBA students and alumni from European schools

The team had an incredible focus on their attendees and built a programme with a carefully judged mix of talks, panels, networking and social events to ensure attendees gained maximum value from the event.

They secured sponsorship and speakers from some of the companies that our students most want to hear from and work for (e.g. McKinsey & Co, BCG, IBM, Microsoft, Google, Accenture, Unilever, American Express, Barclays, Morgan Stanley, Goldman Sachs, General Mills). They also successfully involved faculty to share our thought leadership and alumni to keep our whole community engaged.

I thought their overall survey score of 100% recommendations and 4.9/5 would be the highest any conference would ever achieve…

 

Family Business Summit (Summer 2014)
Conversations on Family Business

Our first ‘perfect’ conference according to feedback from attendees: All survey respondents ‘strongly agreed’ that they would recommend this event to current/future colleagues.

I also shortlisted this event last year for the same reasons – they keep it small, maximise interactions between guests and speakers and run workshops to go into depth and ensure attendees get the most out of the event.

 

The Women in Business Summit (Spring 2014)
Sprints & Marathons: The Sustainable Career

A super slick and inspirational event which wowed attendees and those involved in helping support the event – I still am receiving positive feedback from colleagues who attended and worked with the conference team.

The club and School launched a survey at the event that was picked up across press and media

Engaging speakers, packed venue and an enthusiastic audience – watch highlights here

 

 

 

The winner…

A tough choice but I decided to give the award to the eurOUT conference.

All of the shortlisted events (and many of the others not shortlisted) were exceptional. In my opinion the eurOUT conference edged ahead of the others by striving and succeeding in making a meaningful impact on their attendees’ professional development. Congratulations to the club and to the organisers. And good luck for this year’s event!

 

 

—-

*The conference survey-

The main question I ask is whether the attendee would ‘recommend the event to current/future colleagues’: 1=Strongly disagree; 5=Strongly agree.

I ask all conferences to gain responses from at least 10% of their attendees to be included. Note that we don’t include TEDxLondonBusinessSchool in this as they run an independent survey through TEDx – although arguably they are one of our most successful conferences. I will feature them separately later this year.

The full breakdown of scores:

Name Survey score
% recommending
Africa Business Summit 4.5 89
Art Investment 3.7 84
Asia Business Forum 4.3 94
Asset Management 4.3 92
Corporate Sustainability 4.4 89
eCommerce 4.4 93
Energy 4.2 81
Family Business 5 100
Healthcare 4.1 82
India Business Forum 4.5 93
Latam 4.6 100
Middle East 4.5 94
Out in Business 4.9 100
Private Equity 4.2 84
Real Estate 4.4 95
Tech Media 4.4 88
Women in Business 4.6 93

 

Thank you for reading!

Jon Conradi
Senior Student Activities Manager
Degree Programmes Office

Read the rest of this entry »

Global_sports_symposium_LogoThis summer a new conference will be gracing our diaries, The Global Sports Symposium. The Global Sports Symposium, which is being presented by the same team behind the US-based Ivy Sports Symposium (Sports Symposium, Inc.), this student-run event, will bring together the leading decision-makers of the industry for a day of networking, discourse and learning.  The organization is excited to be expanding internationally by hosting the first GSS in partnership with Arsenal FC and Emirates Stadium.

This year not only is it the first event outside the US, but there is a dedicated Career Workshop, We have partnered with GlobalSportsJobs on the Careers Workshop, “Supercharge Your Career in Sports – Powered by GlobalSportsJobs”. Where you can learn from those who have made it in the industry.

 

There are over 30 speakers, 6 panels and 2 workshops. To name just a few of the confirmed speakers we have:

  • Mark Lamping (Jacksonville Jaguars, President)
  • Michael Cunnah (iSportConnect, Executive)
  • Tom Fox               (Arsenal FC, Chief Commercial Officer)
  • Charles Baker    (DLA Piper, Partner)
  • Abeed Janmohamed      (RadiumOne, Commercial Director Europe)
  • Jim O’Toole        (London Irish Rugby Club, Commercial Director)
  • Paul Bell              (Leeds United, Commercial Director)
  • Jeff Bennet        (Raptor Sports Properties, LLC, Chief Executive Officer)
  • Lucien Boyer      (Havas SE, President and Global CEO)
  • Matt Rogan        (Two Circles, Managing Director)
  • Russell Stopford (Perform, Director of Product Development)
  • Adam Paker       (Commonwealth Games England (CGE), Chief Executive)
  • Ameesh Manek                (England Basketball, Director)
  • Glenn Lovett     (Repucom, Senior Management)
  • Phil Carling         (Octagon (UK), Head of Football)
  • Bob Reeves        (Rugby Football Union, President)

 

The Sports Symposium has traditionally welcomed student attendees from over 60 colleges and universities and professional delegates from a wide range of companies.  Its intimate setting combined with engaging content and dynamic speakers have made it a “must attend” event every year; we are certain that the same successes will be met during our first global conference.

How will you benefit from attending whilst studying?

  • There is a very generous student discount!
  • You will gain a unrivalled knowledge of the sports business industry
  • Network opportunities! Meet your idols in the sports business industry
  • A Career workshop “Supercharge Your Career in Sports – Powered by GlobalSportsJobs” – A chance to talk directly with and have your questions answered by young professionals across a breadth of industries within sport.
  • Free goodies- Including breakfast and lunch!

 

The Sports Symposium is dedicated to helping students and those new to the sports business industry, by providing opportunities to network with top level executives, creating career workshops and offer industry insights.The symposium promises to bring a 360 degree view of the Sports Business world, with talks and panels representing all aspects of the business. However, it comes with a nice twist as it’s aimed at both seasoned professionals and those who want to enter the business.

“Throughout the planning process the student-run team has received positive feedback from the industry leaders it has reached out to.  We believe this is a testament to the US-based Ivy Sports Symposium that has attracted top industry names over the course of its eight-year history. We are expecting similar successes for this first event in the UK and continue to get excited as we move forward with our planning.”

Harriet Thayer, 2014 Global Sports Symposium Co-Chair

The 1st annual Global Sports Symposium (“GSS”) takes place on Thursday, May 15, 2014 at Emirates Stadium in London. The registration page can be accessed from our site: http://www.sportssymposium.org or here.

We hope that you share our enthusiasm for the 2014 Global Sports Symposium and that you will be able to join us and help spread the word.  If you need an extra push to take the leap and attend these events read: 10 Reasons Why Uni Students Should Attend Conferences.

Follow us on Twitter @SportsSymposium and our dedicated hash tag #GSS2014, to keep up to date with The Global Sports Symposium.

Read the rest of this entry »

3A3EA9B6-2ACD-4D0B-A114-221D437199CD

Tickets for the 12th Annual Middle East Conference are now on sale:

https://clubs.london.edu/MEC/rsvp?club=MEC&id=21662
http://www.lbsmiddleeastconference.com/

The London Business School Middle East Club is delighted to invite you to the 12th annual Middle East Conference.

The theme of the 2014 Middle East Conference is “Bridging the Gap“. We would like to offer you an unparalleled opportunity to engage with the region’s leading CEO’s, entrepreneurs, financiers, innovators and leaders through five keynote speeches and a panel session on the future of Islamic Finance held by professionals from J.P. Morgan, Strategy& (Formerly known as Booz & Company), Cobalt Underwriting and King & Spalding, which will be followed by a networking reception.

Keynote speakers:

  • HRH Prince Turki bin Faisal Al Saud, Former Saudi Ambassador to the United States and Founder of the King Faisal Foundation
  • HE Riad T. Salamé, Governor of Banque du Liban
  • Shaikha Al Bahar, Deputy Group CEO of National Bank of Kuwait
  • Dr. Saad Al Barrak, Chairman of ILA Group and former CEO of Zain Group
  • Joe Saddi, Managing Director at Strategy& (formerly Booz & Company)

 

The Conference will be held on Friday the 30th of May (1PM-8PM) at the Landmark Hotel in London. For queries, please contact: MEC_LBS@london.edu

Register for the Conference here:
https://clubs.london.edu/MEC/rsvp?club=MEC&id=21662

MEC2014_Email_9

Read the rest of this entry »