Posts Tagged ‘Student Clubs’

The great business thinker Milton Friedman once said “the business of business is business”. Perhaps at the time this was true but I must admit that this idea has never sat comfortably with me. In fact, I positively disagree with it – with a passion. Business, businesspeople and business education have the most phenomenal power to impact positive change in the world. Business school equips students with skills and knowledge to act as global citizens, charged to support those less fortunate. In my opinion, “the business of business is responsibility”. I refer to responsibility in all its facets. Responsibility to drive stakeholder value, to ensure good customer experience, to protect consumer rights and to deal responsibly with both employees and clients. But the responsibility of good business extends further – to use our skills and experience to support those in society that require assistance; whether this be through giving time, financial assistance or guidance. CEO of cloud computing giant SalesForce, Mark Benioff, devised the 1:1:1 model of integrated corporate philanthropy. The model is a commitment to contribute 1% of equity, 1% of employee hours and 1% of product back to the community it serves and has now been adopted by over 700 companies worldwide. During my Silicon Valley GIFT with LBS, I was privileged to see the UCSF Benioff Children’s Hospital in South San Francisco; a world-class medical facility that not only treats thousands of sick children each year but is committed to improving children’s health worldwide. The project is a testament to Benioff’s commitment to philanthropy, CSR and the ‘business of responsibility’.

As a business school student from a non-profit background, creating impact has always been of the utmost importance to me. Following my time with the LBS in California, I took the opportunity to connect with a NY-based child health charitable foundation. Together with a team of counsellors and medical personnel, we brought 50 children suffering from cancer to Orlando for a week of fun and respite. Many of these children have interrupted intense chemotherapy sessions and prolonged hospital stays (think 6months plus), at the approval of their physicians, to spend a few days relaxing on rollercoasters and eating ice-cream in Florida’s winter sun. Most of these children are bald, many are wheelchair-bound and several are constantly wired to medical machinery and monitors. Imagine, therefore, people’s surprise as they watched us scream our way through roller-coaster rides and dance alongside characters at the Disney parades. Days were spent zooming around The Magic Kingdom, SeaWorld and the Universal Studio Parks. Nights were spent sleepless – administering drugs, prepping gastric tubes and dealing with medical complications. Armed with open-access trips to ToysRUs, skip-the-queue passes at all amusement parks and fireworks displays galore, the trip of a lifetime was had by all and unbridled happiness permeated the entire experience. Although fun and laughter hasn’t yet been scientifically-proven to cure cancer, there is no doubt that all the kids returned home with a fresh hope, renewed smiles and greater strength to battle and overcome their challenges. Many of our kids are already back in hospitals across the US undergoing treatment – I wish them all well and a New Year filled with only much happiness and good health!

The London Business School is committed to “changing the way the world does business” and an integral facet of this pledge is to positively impact society. LBS’ trifecta: The Volunteers Club, Net Impact Club and Impact Consulting Club offer some of our best talent to the community; giving guidance, time and resources to support local non-profits and social enterprises. It is something about which our school community is incredibly proud and for many students, involvement in these clubs is the start of a lifelong pursuit in driving impact from operations to the boardroom, and a commitment to solving communal and global challenges. LBS is a school committed to holistic business education – an institution that creates leaders who solve problems using their minds as well as their hearts.

Wishing all our readers – students, potential students, alums and supporters – a very happy and successful 2017!

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First I will introduce myself as this is my first post here: my name is Bruna, I am Brazilian and guess what… I was assigned to Stream B at LBS! I got a triple B here but still don’t know if the Program Office did it on purpose.

Before starting the MBA, especially after looking at the Programme Content, I had some expectations about how my student life would be. Some were totally mistaken and I’ll tell you all about this now.

 

1.Workload and Homework

 

Expectation: I knew the MBA was going to be busy with many different activities, but somehow we can’t really believe when others advise us… You look at the school website, the core courses and the program structure and it all seems totally manageable, totally fine! After all, we all had to work more than 10 hours a day, weekends and holidays occasionally. Of course, it takes some time to adapt to a new routine, but once it is established, I was sure it was going to be smooth.

 

Reality: Actually, there is no such thing as routine here! When you think you understood your weekly schedule, they just change everything on the next week. Thought I would never have classes at 8:15 in the morning, now I am having it for the next… well, have to check my schedule again. By the way, during the MBA you are going to say and hear this a lot! You are going to learn all about scheduling apps and methods to set up meetings. Get ready and find some space to install many apps in your mobile!

LBS MBA reactions reality cat too busy runnning bruna moreira

Source: reddit.com

 

2. Corporate Finance classes

 

Expectation: I do not have a Finance background and I knew a lot of my classmates would be aiming to intern in Finance positions. This meant high-level Finance courses since the beginning, no surprise! I thought it would be very, very, very hard to follow the classes.

 

Reality: I just loved the Corporate Finance classes! And I also think my whole class fell in love with our teacher Anna Pavlova, who read a Finance poem in our first class and proved we can have some fun in class (not as much as in a beach drinking piña coladas, but still…). Not that the content is easy, but it is taught in a way that everybody learns it smoothly.

lisa simpson in love bruna moreira reaction to LBS MBA

Source: giphy.com

 

 

3. Non-traditional post-MBA career opportunities

 

Expectation: My initial post-MBA goal is to continue working in Tech and Telecom and I thought it would be very hard to find opportunities for MBAs outside of the traditional Finance and Consulting industries.

 

Reality: Turns out that not only Finance and Consulting companies are talking about technology, but also the Tech & Media Club is one of the most active professional clubs at LBS. We seriously believe David Morris does not sleep! We get at least 2-3 career opportunities a week from him. And there are also jobs and networking opportunities coming from so many other Clubs: Industry, Net Impact, Energy, Infrastructure & Construction, Sports Business, and many regional Clubs.

cat confused with so many options bruna moreira reaction to LBS MBA

Source: unbounce.com

 

So, after all my research (I did a lot, believe me! Or look at GMAT Club and you’ll see it) before the MBA, I still had some wrong expectations. But it turns out to be really amazing and much better than I imagined! I am sure I did the right choice when I decided for LBS. I recommend you do a profound research and analyse how prepared you are before you start this journey. Then, just open your mind and dive into a new adventure.

 

Please leave any questions or comments bellow. I’ll be very happy to read and reply!

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At the end of each term I look at the data we collect through student activities.

Below, I’ve put together five quick summaries of some different ways of looking at club activities in the Autumn term.

Which clubs do you think are the best?

 

Top five clubs, by number of registrations to events:

Club RSVPs
Private Equity & Venture Capital 2001
Finance 1459
Industry 1270
Investment Management 1265
Consulting 1085

 

Top five clubs, with the highest % of alumni and executive students:

Club % of ‘exec’ RSVPs
Volleyball 44%
Sailing 40%
Poker 33%
Entrepreneurship 31%
Real Estate 31%

One of the advantages of LBS is the diversity of programmes. This table shows the % of registrations from alumni and our senior career students that are also often studying part-time: Sloan, EMBAs, MiF PT and Executive Education programmes.

Simply put, if you’re an MBA and want to connect with the members of our community who are most likely to be able to help find you a job, it may be time to start learning volleyball…

 

Top five clubs, with the highest ratings for networking:

Clubs Networking rating
Military in Business 4.8
Women in Business 4.5
Energy 4.4
Healthcare 4.4
Finance 4.3

We asked students to rate whether the Professional Interest Clubs had helped them ‘connect with people and businesses relevant to their future career’.

5 = Strongly agree; 3 = neither agree/disagree; 1 = Strongly disagree

 

Top five clubs, with the highest ratings for learning:

Clubs Rating for learning
Military in Business 4.4
Finance 4.4
Energy 4.3
Industry 4.3
Net Impact 4.3

We asked students to rate whether the Professional Interest Clubs had helped them ‘gain knowledge and/or skills relevant to their future career’.

5 = Strongly agree; 3 = neither agree/disagree; 1 = Strongly disagree

 

Top five clubs, which send emails their members actually read:

Clubs % emails opened
Women’s Touch Rugby 71
Nordic 70
Women’s Football 67
Military in Business 66
Snow 59

 

A big thank you to all our club leaders and officers who make LBS such a vibrant community! If you want to find out more about any of the clubs, have a look at: clubs.london.edu/groups

 

Jon Conradi
Senior Student Activities Manager
Degree Programmes Office

 

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Many university club events are just about having fun. Deciding whether to take part is pretty simple.

Business school clubs provide a breadth and depth of professional activities such as speaker events, competitions, career treks, conferences and leadership positions. This can make it more difficult to decide what to get involved in.

How do I make the most out of these opportunities? What will I learn? What are the networking opportunities? How do I avoid missing out whilst not spreading myself too thin? What should I put on my CV?

 

My advice – as the Senior Student Activities Manager at LBS - would be to treat them as part of your professional development and take a structured approach:

 

Step 1 – Frame

Think about your long-term career aims, what gaps are there between where you are now and where you want to be? How could extra-curricular activity help?

Link this to the advice from Career Services and Organisational Behaviour Courses.

As an example, these slides are from a presentation by Professor Margaret Ormiston on how to use club leadership as a personal development opportunity:

(link: http://www.slideshare.net/londonbusinessschool/incoming-leaders)

 

Step 2 – Explore and develop

There are a huge amount of club events – you will regularly have to choose between different activities.  Actively assess their relevance to you and what you’re trying to achieve, don’t just follow the crowd.

Ask yourself – How will the activity help me develop relevant skills, expertise, networks? How do they help me find out more about areas that interest me?

Establish one or two tangible outcomes that you would aim to get out of each event e.g. a new contact or an alumni’s perspective on a business you’re considering joining.

Student leadership roles can also provide a relatively safe environment to practise particular skills or try out new ways of leading.

 

Step 3 – Demonstrate

Club activity isn’t going to help your CV!

Once you’re in business school, your club involvement is unlikely to make much difference to your CV.

To illustrate this, a few years ago we analysed CV submissions to consultancy firms to see if different content changed the likelihood of being invited to interviews. We found there was no statistically significant benefit to putting student leadership roles on CVs.

Instead, think about how you could talk about your different activities in interviews.

Think about what your club involvement says about your willingness to contribute to the community you’re in, how it shows passion for your area of business, how you have been able to use contacts that will be valuable in your future role.

Specific experiences may also help complement your business experience. For example, club leaders often have plenty of examples of how they’ve been able to motivate others or resolve conflicts. They can also provide ‘safe’ examples of failure and learning.

 

Step 4 – Reflect

Periodically, take time to reflect: What have you learnt? Do you need to reassess your involvement? Are you now able to focus on a narrower range of businesses or opportunities?

Talk to your peers and compare what you’re getting from these activities. Peer-to-peer coaching can also be a valuable tool – now is a great time to practise: https://hbr.org/2010/02/cultivate-your-coaching-networ-2/

Take time every few weeks to reflect on what you’re learning through student activities and go through these steps again.

 

 

To give some examples here are a selection of some of the great learning opportunities through student-led activities at London Business School:

 

-          Practise stock picking (and presenting your picks)

-          Student leadership as a way to practise ‘delivering through others’

-          Get involved in the TELL Series to hear entrepreneurial success stories first-hand and help find and select inspiring founders

-          Take part in the Global Social Venture Competition to test your business idea:

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Our student-led conferences are back!

This year’s events begin with the China Business Forum on 18 October, so I thought this would be a good opportunity to talk about the award for best student-led event.

I am Jon, the Senior Student Activities Manager at the School, and my team helps support the multitude of professional student-led clubs and events that are such a prominent part of student life here at London Business School. Last year was the second year that I ran club awards for the autumn and spring terms. At the end of each academic year I also look back at the best student-led event of the year.

While there are always incredible cultural trips and a constant stream of high quality career treks, I tend to be most interested in our student-led conferences. These present some of the best student-led activities in terms of enhancing students’ professional development and raising the profile of our brand. They are also a great way for the conference team to practise leadership skills and learn more about their sector.

Last year we had our first ‘perfect’ conference according to feedback from attendees*; we also saw our first examples of our conferences making it into international press (e.g. the Asset Management Conference ). Several other conferences also raised their profile and it was great to see an improvement overall (on an already high standard). The best events tended to be those that concentrated on what an attendee gains from the event rather than making the event ‘bigger’:

Conferences 2013-14 2012-13
Number of conferences surveying their attendees 17 13
Average score 4.4 / 5 4.2 / 5
% positively recommending 93% 86%
 Approximate number of attendees  2000  1800

More details on the conference surveys below*

 

My shortlist of the best conferences of 2013-14

This is from a combination of survey results, feedback from attendees and colleagues and from working with the teams:

 

Africa Business Summit (Summer 2014)
Beyond the hype: The not-for-tourists guide to investing in Africa

This was arguably our most professional event and was on an impressive scale: 45 speakers, sold out with 350 attendees (the majority external guests), over 20 sponsors and partners, moderated by a CNN business correspondent (Zain Asher), the most social media engagement of any of our events and they also launched an entrepreneurship competition.

This conference, more than any other I’ve seen, highlighted the hard-work, determination and ability of its organisers and the club’s presidents – it was a year in the planning and excelled across all areas.

If you aren’t currently thinking about doing business in Africa this conference (and the club itself) will change your mind.

 

eurOUT (Autumn 2013)
the premier conference for LGBT MBA students and alumni from European schools

The team had an incredible focus on their attendees and built a programme with a carefully judged mix of talks, panels, networking and social events to ensure attendees gained maximum value from the event.

They secured sponsorship and speakers from some of the companies that our students most want to hear from and work for (e.g. McKinsey & Co, BCG, IBM, Microsoft, Google, Accenture, Unilever, American Express, Barclays, Morgan Stanley, Goldman Sachs, General Mills). They also successfully involved faculty to share our thought leadership and alumni to keep our whole community engaged.

I thought their overall survey score of 100% recommendations and 4.9/5 would be the highest any conference would ever achieve…

 

Family Business Summit (Summer 2014)
Conversations on Family Business

Our first ‘perfect’ conference according to feedback from attendees: All survey respondents ‘strongly agreed’ that they would recommend this event to current/future colleagues.

I also shortlisted this event last year for the same reasons – they keep it small, maximise interactions between guests and speakers and run workshops to go into depth and ensure attendees get the most out of the event.

 

The Women in Business Summit (Spring 2014)
Sprints & Marathons: The Sustainable Career

A super slick and inspirational event which wowed attendees and those involved in helping support the event – I still am receiving positive feedback from colleagues who attended and worked with the conference team.

The club and School launched a survey at the event that was picked up across press and media

Engaging speakers, packed venue and an enthusiastic audience – watch highlights here

 

 

 

The winner…

A tough choice but I decided to give the award to the eurOUT conference.

All of the shortlisted events (and many of the others not shortlisted) were exceptional. In my opinion the eurOUT conference edged ahead of the others by striving and succeeding in making a meaningful impact on their attendees’ professional development. Congratulations to the club and to the organisers. And good luck for this year’s event!

 

 

—-

*The conference survey-

The main question I ask is whether the attendee would ‘recommend the event to current/future colleagues’: 1=Strongly disagree; 5=Strongly agree.

I ask all conferences to gain responses from at least 10% of their attendees to be included. Note that we don’t include TEDxLondonBusinessSchool in this as they run an independent survey through TEDx – although arguably they are one of our most successful conferences. I will feature them separately later this year.

The full breakdown of scores:

Name Survey score
% recommending
Africa Business Summit 4.5 89
Art Investment 3.7 84
Asia Business Forum 4.3 94
Asset Management 4.3 92
Corporate Sustainability 4.4 89
eCommerce 4.4 93
Energy 4.2 81
Family Business 5 100
Healthcare 4.1 82
India Business Forum 4.5 93
Latam 4.6 100
Middle East 4.5 94
Out in Business 4.9 100
Private Equity 4.2 84
Real Estate 4.4 95
Tech Media 4.4 88
Women in Business 4.6 93

 

Thank you for reading!

Jon Conradi
Senior Student Activities Manager
Degree Programmes Office

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Preparing for the start of term

Posted by: Jeremy
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Having been at London Business School for a month now, I think the thing I was most surprised by was how quickly things went from relatively relaxed in first week to ridiculously busy with no time to sleep. The flow of time is weird too. At the start it was very slow but now it’s picking up. Maybe some people with psychology backgrounds can comment on that.

But going back on topic, it’s not really the classes that get you, but rather the flood of club events, applying for info sessions and Peer Leadership Programme spots, applying for leadership positions in clubs (yes, MiMs can apply for executive spots for clubs at London Business School), doing practice case interviews (if you’re interested in consulting; if you’re into finance then you’re already applying and busier than normal with finalizing CVs and cover letters before everyone else), networking, etc, etc, etc. The list goes on.

Speaking of networking, the school will drill into your head that networking is very important here—although I don’t think a lot of us have a good grasp of how to do it yet in all types of situations. What I mean by ‘types’ of networking is that networking doesn’t just mean participating in those networking ‘events’ after info-sessions. That is just one type of networking—a type that is ill-suited for people like me who are on the deep end of introversion (it’s something to adjust to, personally). There is the more private and frankly more constant side to networking of talking with your peers about their (and your) pasts and values, working with your case interview practice groups and sharing information during breaks, and getting involved with clubs.

On the subject of clubs, I think those are probably the best forums for networking because you already know that they have similar interests as you. As a personal example, I recently interviewed for an analyst position at SA (Student Association) Strategy, which is a student consulting group that provides consulting services for London Business School. At the end of the interview (it went very well), I found out that my interviewer was actually involved in something called Social Return on Investment (SROI), which is something that coming into London Business School I wanted to learn more about! It was quite amazing to make that connection and I’m really keen (not standard cover letter, “I’m keen to join your company!” but like really, super keen and excited. On the topic of cover letters, do not make them boring and standard. The point is to be different. I’ll write more on that in a future post.) to work with her over the next year.

All that being said about the importance of networking and just getting out there, taking risks, and trying different things, it is extremely important for you to manage your time effectively—especially in terms of managing commitments. There are so many opportunities that if you start to apply for everything you have an interest in, you’ll probably wear yourself thin trying to do everything. So pick and choose. Be strategic. But when you’ve decided, devote yourself to it for real. That’s where you’ll see the true learning benefits at London Business School.

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